Chorus

On the bus to Montgomery I knew that anger was ahead and crazy white mobs would toss Coke bottles and rocks and any other hard thing that was at hand. Hate is hard. But we sing. Love rises in this throaty chorus.

 

33 Comments Chorus

  1. theinnerzone June 2, 2014 at 10:54 am

    I always love your responses to these prompts. Very well done!

    Reply
    1. Meg June 3, 2014 at 7:52 am

      Thank you — and thanks for the follow!

      Reply
    1. Meg June 3, 2014 at 7:52 am

      Thanks so much. Glad you enjoyed it.

      Reply
  2. paulmclem June 2, 2014 at 12:31 pm

    Powerful and defiant message here. Good one.

    Reply
    1. Meg June 3, 2014 at 7:53 am

      Thanks, Paul! Defiant is good!

      Reply
    1. Meg June 3, 2014 at 7:54 am

      I was afraid it would sound too coarse but I’m happy you liked it! Thanks for reading, Natalie!

      Reply
  3. jacquelinecaseypoetry June 2, 2014 at 3:38 pm

    Nice answer for why the caged bird sings: bravado (the singing) overrides their arrogant imprisonment.

    Reply
    1. Meg June 3, 2014 at 7:55 am

      Yes, indeed, joyous bravado overcomes everything. That’s my theory anyway. Thanks for reading and commenting, Jacqueline.

      Reply
    1. Meg June 3, 2014 at 7:56 am

      I’m so glad. Thank you! I appreciate your reading.

      Reply
    1. Meg June 3, 2014 at 7:57 am

      Thank you. I love your blog’s name.

      Reply
  4. Stacie June 2, 2014 at 7:41 pm

    I like to think love eventually conquers hate. But it seems we’re still struggling with that, even in 2014.

    Reply
    1. Meg June 3, 2014 at 8:00 am

      Me too, Stacie. It’s been a rough century so far, hasn’t it? I struggled with this prompt because my own hope keeps shrinking. Sigh.

      Reply
    1. Meg June 3, 2014 at 8:02 am

      Thanks, Patricia. I’m counting on that too.

      Reply
  5. M. L. Sexton June 2, 2014 at 8:20 pm

    Always sing, even through the worst of times.

    Reply
    1. Meg June 3, 2014 at 8:03 am

      Thanks for reading and posting, M.L. I think singing might be everything.

      Reply
  6. Jen June 2, 2014 at 9:12 pm

    I love your responses!

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    1. Meg June 3, 2014 at 8:05 am

      Aww, thanks, Jen. I love writing them. I let my crazy brain write this one at 8am yesterday, so that I’d get on the grid.

      Reply
  7. C.C. June 2, 2014 at 10:11 pm

    This is such an emotional, meaningful response to the prompt. Although there is still too much hard hate in the world, imagining Rosa Parks reading this makes me happy about how far we’ve come 🙂

    Reply
    1. Meg June 3, 2014 at 8:10 am

      Thanks so much for your kind, lovely words, C.C. I was too young to be a Freedom Rider (I was 1 year old) but I would like to think if I were old enough, I would have joined up. Oddly enough, they met in Ohio to organize–I believe before the buses left D.C. I love that.

      Reply
  8. innatejames June 2, 2014 at 11:43 pm

    The ride from the beginning of the poem to the end feels like going from confrontation to a church revival. Loved it, Meg! Beautiful!

    Reply
    1. Meg June 3, 2014 at 8:11 am

      Thank you, Nate. As always, your kind comments mean the world to me. I’m glad you liked it.

      Reply
  9. Jennifer G. Knoblock June 3, 2014 at 2:29 am

    Beautiful last line. Your rhythm is always perfect.

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    1. Meg June 3, 2014 at 8:13 am

      Aww, thanks, Jennifer! The rhythm, ironically, is always a happy accident.

      Reply
      1. Jennifer G. Knoblock June 3, 2014 at 9:23 am

        It’s in your soul, apparently 🙂

        Reply
  10. KymmInBarcelona June 3, 2014 at 7:22 am

    Excellent closing line! The language is so expressive of the occasion, too.

    Reply
    1. Meg June 3, 2014 at 8:14 am

      I’m so glad you liked it, Kymm. It felt like a weighty prompt. Thanks for reading and commenting. Means a lot.

      Reply
  11. Dawn June 3, 2014 at 7:43 pm

    Loved it. It had a rawness to it and I could picture a scene right away. Great job 🙂

    Reply

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